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Convergent evolution of the social brain? A comparative dog-human fMRI approach

Abstract
Recent years have provided increasingly detailed insights into the neural mechanisms of human social cognition. However, our knowledge about human sociality remains incomplete without considering its evolutionary roots. In the last decade, dogs have become the second main non-human model of social cognition besides primates. Dogs are of special interest for evolutionary models of social cognition as humans share a common history of several thousand years with them. Previous comparative research on dogs has been predominantly behavioral, and the few studies on dogs’ brain function have focused on non-social information processing. The present proposal will overcome this limitation and investigate how dogs process the actions, emotions and intentions of other dogs, and of humans. We will use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and measure neural responses in dogs specifically trained to participate in social cognitive neuroscience experiments. Matching experiments in humans will allow us to test the key hypothesis that social information processing relies on similar neuro-cognitive and -affective mechanisms in dogs and humans. In three main areas, imitation, empathy and Theory of Mind, we will furthermore investigate whether social cues from con- and heterospecifics are processed in a similar way by dogs and humans. This will generate crucial new insights into central questions of cognitive science about the (convergent) evolution of social cognition.
Lemma
EVOSOCBRAIN
Coordination for vetmeduni vienna
Huber Ludwig
Duration
01.10.19-30.09.22
Programme
WWTF Cognitive Sciences Call 2018
Type of Research
Basic research
Staff
Huber L.,
Vetmed Research Units
Messerli Research Institute, Comparative Cognition
Funded by
Wiener Wissenschafts-, Forschungs- und Technologiefonds (WWTF), Schlickgasse 3/12, 1090 Wien, Austria
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