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Major Urinary Proteins: Re-examining the functions in chemosensory communication

Abstract
House mice (Mus musculus) communicate through complex chemical signals, which convey a surprising amount of information about an individual (e.g., social status, health, infection status, disease resistance), and they mediate kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance. Understanding how chemical signals provide such information has been a major challenge. Male house mice produce large quantities of protein in their urine (major urinary proteins or MUPs), which transport pheromones to the urine and stabilize the release of these volatiles from scent marks over time. MUPs are encoded by 21 functional genes in mice and individuals vary in the number of MUPs they express in their urine. It has been suggested that MUPs provide a unique individual signature or ‘barcode’ that mediates individual recognition, kin recognition, and mating preferences. Our general aim is to investigate variation in MUPs and test whether they provide signals of individual compatibility or quality to potential mates.
Statistik Austria, science classification
106002         Biochemistry
106012         Evolutionary research
106048         Animal physiology
106051         Behavioural biology
Keywords
barcode hypothesis
chemosensory communication
house mouse (M. musculus)
Major Urinary Proteins (MUPs)
quality signaling hypothesis
sexual selection
Lemma
Haupturinproteine
Project leader
Penn Dustin
Duration
01.09.12-30.11.17
Type of Research
Basic research
Staff
Thoß M., Project team member
Luzynski K., Project team member
Vetmed Research Units
Institute for Medical Biochemistry
Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology
Funded by
FWF - Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung, Sensengasse 1, 1090 Wien, Austria

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26 Publications

Penn, DJ; Számadó, S (2019): The Handicap Principle: how an erroneous hypothesis became a scientific principle. Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2019;
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Thonhauser, KE; Raffetzeder, A; Penn, DJ (2019): Sexual experience has no effect on male mating or reproductive success in house mice. Sci Rep. 2019; 9(1):12145
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Thoß, M; Luzynski, KC; Enk, VM; Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Kwak, J; Ortner, I; Penn, DJ (2019): Regulation of volatile and non-volatile pheromone attractants depends upon male social status. Sci Rep. 2019; 9(1):489
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Thonhauser, KE; Tscheppe, G; Gantenbein, F; Rülicke, T; Penn, DJ (2018): Does strategic sperm production depend upon male quality? 69-69.-European Conference on Behavioural Biology (ECBB) 2018; AUG 9-12, 2018; Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Penn, DJ; Számado, S (2018): The trade-offs of honest signals. 53-53.-European Conference on Behavioural Biology; AUG 9-12, 2018; Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Zala, SM; Reitschmidt, D; Noll, A; Balazs, P; Penn, DJ (2017): Sex-dependent modulation of ultrasonic vocalizations in house mice (Mus musculus musculus). PLoS One. 2017; 12(12):e0188647
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Zala, SM; Reitschmidt, D; Noll, A; Balazs, P; Penn, DJ (2017): Automatic mouse ultrasound detector (A-MUD): A new tool for processing rodent vocalizations. PLoS One. 2017; 12(7):e0181200
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Thoß, M; Enk, V; Yu, H; Miller, I; Luzynski, KC; Balint, B; Smith, S; Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Penn, DJ (2016): Diversity of major urinary proteins (MUPs) in wild house mice. Sci Rep. 2016; 6:38378
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Enk, VM; Baumann, C; Thoß, M; Luzynski, KC; Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Penn, DJ (2016): Regulation of highly homologous major urinary proteins in house mice quantified with label-free proteomic methods. Mol Biosyst. 2016; 12(10):3005-3016
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Thoß, M; Luzynski, KC; Ante, M; Miller, I; Penn, DJ (2015): Major urinary protein (MUP) profiles show dynamic changes rather than individual "barcode" signatures. Front Ecol Evol. 2015; 3:
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Kwak, J; Strasser, E; Luzynski, K; Thoß, M; Penn, DJ (2016): Are MUPs a Toxic Waste Disposal System? PLoS One. 2016; 11(3):e0151474
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Számadó, S; Penn, DJ (2015): Why does costly signalling evolve? Challenges with testing the handicap hypothesis. Animal Behaviour 2015; 110: e9-e12
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Thoß, M; Luzynski, K; Ante, M; Miller, I; Penn, DJ (2015): Major urinary protein (MUP) profiles show dynamic changes rather than individual ‘barcode’ signatures. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 3: 71.
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Smadja, CM; Loire, E; Caminade, P; Thoma, M; Latour, Y; Roux, C; Thoss, M; Penn, DJ; Ganem, G; Boursot, P (2015): Seeking signatures of reinforcement at the genetic level: a hitchhiking mapping and candidate gene approach in the house mouse. Mol Ecol. 2015; 24(16):4222-4237
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Zala, SM; Reitschmidt, D; Penn, DJ (2015): Why do male mice sing? Research Day; APR 21, 2015; Vienna, AUSTRIA. 2015.

Luzynski, K; Thoß, M; Penn, DJ (2015): Production of Major Urinary Proteins (MUP) in male mice depends on social conditions and social status. Research Day; APR 21, 2015; Vienna, AUSTRIA. 2015.

Thoß, M; Luzynski, K; Penn, DJ (2015): Major urinary protein (MUP) profiles show dynamic changes rather than individual 'barcode' signatures. Research Day; APR 21, 2015; Vienna, AUSTRIA. 2015.

Thonhauser, KE; Raveh, S; Penn, DJ (2014): Multiple paternity does not depend on male genetic diversity. Anim Behav. 2014; 93(100):135-141
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Thonhauser, KE; Thoß, M; Musolf, K; Klaus, T; Penn, DJ (2014): Multiple paternity in wild house mice (Mus musculus musculus): effects on offspring genetic diversity and body mass. Ecol Evol. 2014; 4(2):200-209
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Thoß, M (2013): Multiple paternity in wild house mice. 11th International Mammological Congress; Aug 11-16, 2013; Belfast, UK. 2013.

Raveh, S; Sutalo, S; Thonhauser, KE; Thoß, M; Hettyey, A; Winkelser, F; Penn, DJ (2014): Female partner preferences enhance offspring ability to survive an infection. BMC Evol Biol. 2014; 14:14
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Thonhauser, KE; Raveh, S; Hettyey, A; Beissmann, H; Penn, DJ (2013): Why do female mice mate with multiple males? Behav Ecol Sociobiol. 2013; 67:1961-1970
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Thonhauser, KE; Raveh, S; Hettyey, A; Beissmann, H; Penn, DJ (2013): Scent marking increases male reproductive success in wild house mice. Anim Behav. 2013; 86(5):1013-1021

Penn, DJ (2013): Sexual selection in house mice. Seminar Series at the Zoological Institute, University of Basel; SEP 23, 2013; Basel, SWITZERLAND. 2013.

Thonhauser, KE; Raveh, S; Hettyey, A; Beissmann, H; Penn, DJ (2013): Scent marking enhances male reproductive success. -Behaviour 2013 (a joint meeting of the International Ethological Conference & the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour); AUG 4-8, 2013; Newcastle, UK.

Penn, D (2013): Sexual selection, chemical signals and infectious diseases. Department of Evolution, Ecology and Systematics; Ludwig Maximilian University; JAN 16, 2013; Munich, GERMANY. 2013.

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