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Gewählte Publikation:

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Publikationstyp: Zeitschriftenaufsatz
Dokumenttyp: Originalarbeit

Jahr: 2015

AutorInnen: Berry, D; Kuzyk, O; Rauch, I; Heider, S; Schwab, C; Hainzl, E; Decker, T; Müller, M; Strobl, B; Schleper, C; Urich, T; Wagner, M; Kenner, L; Loy, A

Titel: Intestinal Microbiota Signatures Associated with Inflammation History in Mice Experiencing Recurring Colitis.

Quelle: Front Microbiol. 2015; 6:1408



Autor/innen der Vetmeduni Vienna:

Hainzl Eva
Kenner Lukas
Müller Mathias
Strobl Birgit

Beteiligte Vetmed-Organisationseinheiten
Institut für Pathologie, Abteilung für Labortierpathologie
Institut für Tierzucht und Genetik, Abteilung für Molekulare Genetik


Zugehörige(s) Projekt(e): Metagenomik und Metatranskriptomik zur Untersuchung der Darm-Mikrobiota chronisch entzündlicher Darmerkrankungen


Abstract:
Acute colitis causes alterations in the intestinal microbiota, but the microbiota is thought to recover after such events. Extreme microbiota alterations are characteristic of human chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, although alterations reported in different studies are divergent and sometimes even contradictory. To better understand the impact of periodic disturbances on the intestinal microbiota and its compositional difference between acute and relapsing colitis, we investigated the beginnings of recurrent inflammation using the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) mouse model of chemically induced colitis. Using bacterial 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing as well as quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization, we profiled the intestinal and stool microbiota of mice over the course of three rounds of DSS-induced colitis and recovery. We found that characteristic inflammation-associated microbiota could be detected in recovery-phase mice. Successive inflammation episodes further drove the microbiota into an increasingly altered composition post-inflammation, and signatures of colitis history were detectable in the microbiota more sensitively than by pathology analysis. Bacterial indicators of murine colitis history were identified in intestinal and stool samples, with a high degree of consistency between both sample types. Stool may therefore be a promising non-invasive source of bacterial biomarkers that are highly sensitive to inflammation state and history.


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