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Selected Publication:

Type of publication: Journal Article
Type of document: Full Paper

Year: 2011

Authors: Schwarz, B; Ertl, R; Zimmer, S; Netzmann, Y; Klein, D; Schwendenwein, I; Hoven, RV

Title: Estimated prevalence of the GYS-1 mutation in healthy Austrian Haflingers.

Source: Vet Rec. 2011; 169(22):583



Authors Vetmeduni Vienna:

Ertl Reinhard
Klein Dieter
Schwarz Bianca
Schwendenwein Ilse
Van Den Hoven Rene

Vetmed Research Units
Clinical Pathology Platform
University Equine Clinic, Clinical Unit of Equine Internal Medicine
VetCore


Abstract:
The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence and frequency of a mutation in the gene coding for skeletal muscle glycogen synthase type 1 (GYS-1), which is the cause of equine polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) type 1 in a population of 50 Haflingers. GYS-1 genotyping of 50 Haflingers was performed with a validated restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay. The second aim was to compare resting and post-exercise muscle enzyme activities as well as parameters of glucose metabolism in blood between horses with and without the mutation. Nine of the 50 Haflingers were identified to be heterozygous for the mutation (HR). None was homozygous (HH). The estimated HR prevalence was 18 per cent in this herd. Mean aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity at rest and mean creatine kinase and AST activity after exercise were significantly higher in HR compared with RR (homozygote normal) horses. No significant differences could be found in the other parameters.

Keywords Pubmed: Animals
Aspartate Aminotransferases/metabolism
Austria/epidemiology
Breeding
Creatine Kinase/metabolism
Female
Genotype
Glycogen Storage Disease/genetics
Glycogen Storage Disease/veterinary*
Glycogen Synthase/genetics*
Horse Diseases/genetics*
Horses/genetics*
Male
Muscle, Skeletal/enzymology*
Muscle, Skeletal/pathology
Mutation
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length*
Prevalence
Rhabdomyolysis/veterinary


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