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Selected Publication:

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Publication type: Journal Article
Document type: Full Paper

Year: 2019

Author(s): Dale, R; Palma-Jacinto, S; Marshall-Pescini, S; Range, F

Title: Wolves, but not dogs, are prosocial in a touch screen task.

Source: PLoS One. 2019; 14(5):e0215444



Authors Vetmeduni Vienna:

Dale Rachel
Marshall Sarah
Range Friederike

Vetmed Research Units
Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology


Project(s): Understanding the proximate mechanisms of canine cooperation


Abstract:
Prosociality is important for initiating cooperation. Interestingly, while wolves rely heavily on cooperation, dogs" do so substantially less thus leading to the prediction that wolves are more prosocial than dogs. However, domestication hypotheses suggest dogs have been selected for higher cooperation, leading to the opposing prediction- increased prosocial tendencies in dogs. To tease apart these hypotheses we adapted a paradigm previously used with pet dogs to directly compare dogs and wolves. In a prosocial choice task, wolves acted prosocially to in-group partners; providing significantly more food to a pack-member compared to a control where the partner had no access to the food. Dogs did not. Additionally, wolves did not show a prosocial response to non-pack members, in line with previous research that social relationships are important for prosociality. In sum, when kept in the same conditions, wolves are more prosocial than their domestic counterpart, further supporting suggestions that reliance on cooperation is a driving force for prosocial attitudes.


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