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Selected Publication:

Type of publication: Baccalaureate Thesis
Type of document:

Year: 2016

Authors: Riener, Sabine

Title: Befragung zur physiotherapeutischen Behandlung am Pferd.

Other title: Survey of physiotherapeutic treatment in horses

Source: Bakkalaureatsarbeit, Vet. Med. Univ. Wien, pp. 41.


Advisor(s):

Peham Christian

Reviewer(s):
Licka Theresia

Vetmed Research Units:
University Equine Clinic, Clinical Unit of Equine Surgery


Abstract:
The aim of this study was to find detailed information about clients of physiotherapists via an online-survey. During four weeks horse owners had the opportunity to fill in a questionnaire with 25 questions. Additionally the questionnaire was distributed in riding stables in Upper Austria, although this was just a small part of the survey. Finally there were 480 finished questionnaires received and utilized. Furthermore in this study there is an overview of literature concerning different methods of treatment in physiotherapy and their effectiveness. It is hypothesized that horse owners mainly use physiotherapy for their horse when having a problem with them. Furthermore it is claimed that “prominence and reputation” are the most important reasons for the choice of the therapist. As a conclusion it can be stated that the first hypothesis could be clearly verified and the second one partly. This survey shows that less than a third of the horse owners use physiotherapy preventively. The majority draws on physiotherapy due to riding or behavioural problems or health problems. “Prominence and reputation” were named the most after having asked the participants what is most important when choosing a therapist, although it was not the majority. Education is also very important, contrary to price and availability. Generally this survey was the ideal tool for research. Nevertheless for achieving an optimal result an improvement of the questions concerning the responses would be necessary.


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