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Publication type: Diploma Thesis

Year: 2012

Author(s): König, Kerstin

Title: Histomorphometrische Untersuchungen an Darmzotten von Broilern nach Fütterungsstudien mit dem Fusariumtoxin Desoxynivalenol.

Other title: Histological examination of intestinal villi of broiler chickens after a feeding trail with Desoxynivalenol (DON) and the feed additive Mycofix select

Source: Diplomarbeit, Vet. Med. Univ. Wien, pp. 55.


Advisor(s):

Böhm Josef

Reviewer(s):
Witter Kirsti

Vetmed Research Units:
Institute of Animal Nutrition and Functional Plant Compounds


Graduation date: 18.02.13


Abstract:
Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary metabolite produced by Fusarium spp. It can be found on field crops during maturing or harvesting stages (COTE et al., 1985). It is one of the most important mycotoxins in animal feed, all over the world (WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION, 1993). Feed contaminated with DON leads to many acute and chronic diseases in animals. Reduced feed intake results in reduced weight gain, feed refusal, vomiting and gastrointestinal lesions for example. DON leads to immunosuppression, neurological und reproductive disorders (ROCHA et al., 2005). As a result there is a lower efficiency of livestock production, which leads to financial losses. Many authors report about the histological changes in intestinal tract. In their trails, during chronic dietary exposure of DON, the villi became shorter and in some cases thinner (AWAD et al., 2006; GIRIGIS et al., 2010 AWAD et al., 2011; YUNUS et al., 2012). The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the histological variations by measuring the villus height, villus width, crypt depth and Tunica muscularis width and calculating the villus height to crypth depth ratio of tissue samples out of the duodenum and jejunum in artificially DON fed broiler chicken with or without the addition of Mycofix® select.


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