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Type of publication: Journal Article
Type of document: Full Paper

Year: 2021

Authors: Burny, C; Nolte, V; Dolezal, M; Schlötterer, C

Title: Highly parallel genomic selection response in replicated Drosophila melanogaster populations with reduced genetic variation.

Source: Genome Biol Evol. 2021; 13(11):evab239



Authors Vetmeduni Vienna:

Burny Claire Delphine
Dolezal Marlies
Nolte Viola
Schlötterer Christian

Vetmed Research Units
Institute of Population Genetics
Platform Bioinformatics and Biostatistics


Data are deposited in Zenodo | DataLink: https://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5160086


Project(s): ERC ADG: The architecture of adaptation

Interference of adaptive gene expression by experim. evolution

Population Genetics


Abstract:
Many adaptive traits are polygenic and frequently more loci contributing to the phenotype are segregating than needed to express the phenotypic optimum. Experimental evolution with replicated populations adapting to a new controlled environment provides a powerful approach to study polygenic adaptation. Because genetic redundancy often results in nonparallel selection responses among replicates, we propose a modified evolve and resequence (E&R) design that maximizes the similarity among replicates. Rather than starting from many founders, we only use two inbred Drosophila melanogaster strains and expose them to a very extreme, hot temperature environment (29 °C). After 20 generations, we detect many genomic regions with a strong, highly parallel selection response in 10 evolved replicates. The X chromosome has a more pronounced selection response than the autosomes, which may be attributed to dominance effects. Furthermore, we find that the median selection coefficient for all chromosomes is higher in our two-genotype experiment than in classic E&R studies. Because two random genomes harbor sufficient variation for adaptive responses, we propose that this approach is particularly well-suited for the analysis of polygenic adaptation.© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.


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